Myth: Dyslexia does not exist.

Fact: Dyslexia is one of the most researched and documented conditions that affect children. Over 30 years of independent, scientific, replicated, published research exists on dyslexia.

Myth: Dyslexia is a “catch all” term.

Fact: That was true back in the 1960’s and 1970’s before much research had been done. But here in Scotland we have a research-based definition of dyslexia, which is:

Dyslexia can be described as a continuum of difficulties in learning to read, write and/or spell, which does not respond well to conventional teaching techniques. These difficulties often do not reflect an individual’s cognitive ability and are often not typical of performance in other areas.

The affect of dyslexia as a barrier to learning varies in degree according to the learning environment and the demands of the curriculum as there are associated difficulties such as:

  • auditory and /or visual processing of language-based information
  • phonological awareness
  • oral language skills and reading fluency
  • short-term and working memory
  • sequencing and directionality
  • number skills
  • organisational ability

Motor skills and co-ordination are often affected.

Dyslexia exists in all cultures and across the range of abilities and socio-economic backgrounds.  It is neurological in origin; a hereditary, life-long condition.  Unidentified, dyslexia is likely to result in low self esteem, high stress, atypical behaviour, and low achievement. 

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