An interesting post discusses the merits of teaching capital letters before lower case  to children in the early years with ‘dyslexic tendencies’.

The post ends describes a reaction to a workshop:

We had a preschool teacher get upset with our suggestion of studying the uppercase alphabet first. She said  all their teaching materials used the lower case letters first and she insisted the lower case was easier to learn.  The reasons I listed above that make the lower case confusing for a Dyslexic are probably beneficial for left brain learners because they are similar and fewer shapes to learn. The preschool teacher was adamant we were wrong.  This is unfortunately one of the viewpoints of teachers that make it so difficult to help Dyslexic students learn the alphabet, spelling and reading.

It’s so sad when professionals dismiss what can be be simple and obvious ideas. It sounds as if s/he was trying to fit the child to the curriculum rather than start from the child’s learning needs. So, change the teaching materials!! And open your mind a bit!
Surely knowledge of and adaptation for the strengths and difficulties of each individual is paramount – in every, but especially early years, setting.
For pre-schoolers in particular, it’s so important to assume all children will have some dificulties in cracking the code, whether it be sequencing, focusing on what appear to be irrelevant details (‘can’t see the trees for the wood’), symbolic learning, motor skills, etc. If they manage easily that’s great. If not then any potential problems can be identified and addressed at this vital stage.

An interesting post discusses the merits of teaching capital letters before lower case  to children in the early years with ‘dyslexic tendencies’.

The post ends describes a reaction to a workshop:

We had a preschool teacher get upset with our suggestion of studying the uppercase alphabet first. She said  all their teaching materials used the lower case letters first and she insisted the lower case was easier to learn.  The reasons I listed above that make the lower case confusing for a Dyslexic are probably beneficial for left brain learners because they are similar and fewer shapes to learn. The preschool teacher was adamant we were wrong.  This is unfortunately one of the viewpoints of teachers that make it so difficult to help Dyslexic students learn the alphabet, spelling and reading.


It’s so sad when professionals dismiss what can be be simple and obvious ideas. It sounds as if s/he was trying to fit the child to the curriculum rather than start from the child’s learning needs. So, change the teaching materials!! And open your mind a bit!


Surely knowledge of and adaptation for the strengths and difficulties of each individual is paramount – in every, but especially early years, setting.
For pre-schoolers in particular, it’s so important to assume all children will have some dificulties in cracking the code, whether it be sequencing, focusing on what appear to be irrelevant details (‘can’t see the trees for the wood’), symbolic learning, motor skills, etc. If they manage easily that’s great. If not then any potential problems can be identified and addressed at this vital stage.

 

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